Slap me on the Forehead, and put up a big L.

Seriously…

Ok, bright eyed and bushy tailed, I started knitting at around 7 this morning. Did some math, reconfigured hubby’s socks for the 322, and started ribbing. I had several issues with stitches not knitting. Aha!, I thought. I forgot the end weights. I added the end weights.

Knitted some more, but those particular stitches wouldn’t knit. I added more weight. 99 rows down, and I can’t see anything hanging below the ribber, and I should. Matter of fact, the bar I use for casting on should be visible, and it wasn’t.

I started shedding weights. I crawled under the table to see what was going on, but I had to shed even MORE weights just to see! Apparently, a stitch from about row 25 got hung up somewhere, and never let go.

I just thought I had an amazing weight problem. Ha! But now, I have to go start over. Maybe this time, I’ll check before I add weights.

Oh yes, if you’re knitting with a ribber, steel-toed boots come in handy. Weights are heavy!

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Hmm, for the non-machine knitters, and/or non-knitters:

When you knit by hand, you use two to five needles at a time. You can see your work, hold it out, shake it, stare at it till you go cross-eyed. You also push the yarn off the needles as you go.

When you use a flat-bed machine, you can still see one side of your work and use up to 200 needles. On most flat bed machines, (except Passaps) you have to use weights to pull the fabric down and over the needle.

Ribbers are like knitting with 4 hands. You attach the ribber to the flat-bed, to create a double bed. That’s 200 needles on each side. The problem is you can’t see your work. The knitting goes in between the flat-bed and the ribber.

Most problems related to needles not knitting on a machine are related to weight. For flat-bed use, I can usually just use my fishing weights (dipped in plastic to coat the lead), but ribbers require even more weight.

That was obviously not my problem. I wasn’t paying attention when hanging the weights, otherwise, I would have felt the accordion like fabric hang-up. Did I mention that I am stubborn?

I simply continued to add weights, which did work for a while. When I got to the end tho, not so much. It’s a good joke on me.

About the steel-toed boots- anyone have a spare pair? I wasn’t joking. Some of those weights weigh more than my twins!

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